Kokrobite Gardens – a soothing balm for the senses

I spontaneously enquire about Kokrobite Garden’s accommodation a few days before the weekend, hopeful that in these strange Corona times there will still be space. Our weekend plans are cemented when I get warm sounding voice notes from Caye, who owns Kokrobite Gardens with her husband Franko. She tells me in her beautiful Spanish soft-spoken…

Treasures on Accra’s Oxford Street – my 8 favourite things to do and see on this bustling busy road!

Accra’s Oxford Street is worlds apart from its British counterpart you think of upon hearing its name, but full of character and life! Here are 8 lesser known things to do and see on this stretch of road!

Rainy day Reflections in Accra in both senses of the word

*These photos were taken in the rain on the outskirts of Makola Market, Accra. I woke up on Friday feeling a little strange and a bit down, these are not unique emotions in these peculiar times given what the world is going through currently. It was another week of saying goodbye to lovely friends, and…

Red and white lighthouse in Jamestown Accra

A walking tour of Jamestown, Accra – a place of resilience and beauty

A year ago when my mom came to visit us, we first discovered Jamestown. Along with Usshertown these are the oldest districts of Accra. With its iconic bright red and white lighthouse and vibrant colourful buildings, this fishing town is an enlivening place to walk through, and although the extreme poverty will likely leaving you heartbroken and humbled, it is the overwhelming sense of resilience of its people that makes the biggest impression, and this strength pulses through the town like a heart pounding after a strenuous run.

The peculiar Posuban shrines and fanciful Asafo flags of the Fante people of Ghana

It is the delightful mix of bright red, yellow and turquoise colours, shapes and patterns that look like those on playing cards, hearts dangling off balconies that remind me of traditional Scandinavian Christmas ornaments and a blonde man sitting drinking tea at a table with an African man that could be a comic block from a Tin Tin adventure book - these things have me somewhat mesmerized at the photo on my screen. Am I looking at a beautifully illustrated page of a children’s story book or an actual place in Ghana? And how on earth does such an eccentric looking place fit into the culture and history of this country?